Hello Possum – Boom Shankar

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Introducing a story of hope #hellopossum

Introducing a story of hope #hellopossum

Hello Possum!

Hello Possum!

$45 from every sale of our Hello Possum jumper will be donated to the Australian Wildlife Conservancy.  

Hello Possum! Customers who purchased our fun jumper between 30/04/21 to 29/06/21 have helped us raise a total of $4050 for the Australian Wildlife Conservancy.

During the past decade, 37 million native animals have perished due to habitat descrtuction in Australia.

WWF conservation scientist Dr Martin Taylor

Australia has the worst rate of mammal extinction in the world. More than 1,700 species are currently facing extinction.

Australian Wildlife Conservancy

Nearly 3 billion native animals were lost in the 2019-2020 bushfires.

WWF conservation scientist Dr Martin Taylor

Introducing a story of hope #hellopossum

Hello
Possum!

Hello Possum! Customers who purchased our fun jumper between 30/04/21 to 29/06/21 have helped us raise a total of $4050 for the Australian Wildlife Conservancy.

During the past decade, 37 million native animals have perished due to habitat descrtuction in Australia.

WWF conservation scientist Dr Martin Taylor

Australia has the worst rate of mammal extinction in the world. More than 1,700 species are currently facing extinction.

Australian Wildlife Conservancy

Nearly 3 billion native animals were lost in the 2019-2020 bushfires.

WWF conservation scientist Dr Martin Taylor

Aussie wildlife need your help

The Hello Possum Jumper campaign was born out of our founder's passion for animals and desire to help the environment. Through this campaign, our goal is to raise awareness. Using the Boom Shankar platform to educate and provide a significant contribution to the Australian Wildlife Conservation. From every "Hello Possum" Jumper sold, $45 will be donated.

More than 1,800 Australian species are currently facing extinction. In fact, Australia has the worst rate of mammal extinction in the world. Since European settlement in 1788, more than 10% of mammal species have disappeared. Not to mention the recent 2019-2020 bushfires, which resulted in the loss of nearly 3 billion native animals.

Long-nosed potoroos have had their habitat burned by fires.

These appalling statistics are a real wake up call.

We must seize this moment and do everything we can to save Australia's extraordinary biodiversity. So where do we begin?

We believe starting the conversation surrounding these issues is an essential part of the healing process.

"Hello Possum" is just a great Aussie way to greet our loved ones.

Boom Shankar's Hello Possum jumper campaign encourages everyone to take a stand and actively commit to helping with the conservation of native wildlife.

By wearing our jumper and representing these harrowing facts, we hope that "Hello Possum" can start a conversation, which raises awareness and funds to ensure the preservation of the Australian environment.  

Sold out

Aussie wildlife need your help

The Hello Possum Jumper campaign was born out of our founder's passion for animals and desire to help the environment. Through this campaign, our goal is to raise awareness. Using the Boom Shankar platform to educate and provide a significant contribution to the Australian Wildlife Conservation. From every "Hello Possum" Jumper sold, $45 will be donated.

More than 1,800 Australian species are currently facing extinction. In fact, Australia has the worst rate of mammal extinction in the world. Since European settlement in 1788, more than 10% of mammal species have disappeared. Not to mention the recent 2019-2020 bushfires, which resulted in the loss of nearly 3 billion native animals.

Long-nosed potoroos have had their habitat burned by fires.

These appalling statistics are a real wake up call. We must seize this moment and do everything we can to save Australia's extraordinary biodiversity. So where do we begin? We believe starting the conversation surrounding these issues is an essential part of the healing process.

"Hello Possum" is just a great Aussie way to greet our loved ones.

Boom Shankar's Hello Possum jumper campaign encourages everyone to take a stand and actively commit to helping with the conservation of native wildlife.

By wearing our jumper and representing these harrowing facts, we hope that "Hello Possum" can start a conversation, which raises awareness and funds to ensure the preservation of the Australian environment.  

Sold out

Some of Australia's threatened wildlife

Australia is one of the most important nations on Earth for biodiversity. In fact, it is one of only 17 ‘megadiverse’ nations and is home to more species than any other developed country. Click below to learn about Australian wildlife on the Australian Wildlife Conservancy website.

Endangered brush-tailed rock wallabies starving to death from habitat destruction (fire and drought).

Image credit: Craig Pentland / DPAW

Mountain pygmy possums are a critically endangered alpine species

Image credit: Zoos Victoria

Long-nosed potoroos have had their habitat burned by fires. Threats include feral cats, wild dogs, red foxes, human settlement, habitat degradation and inappropriate fire regimes.

Image credit: Adobe Stock

Koalas are in serious decline suffering from the effects of habitat destruction, domestic dog attacks, bushfires and road accidents. The Australian Koala Foundation estimates that there are less than 100,000 Koalas left in the wild, possibly as few as 43,000.

Image credit: ABC News: Rachel Carbonell

Eastern quolls were once part of the Australian landscape for millions of years. The last Eastern quoll on the Australian mainland is thought to have been killed in 1963. The cause of their mainland extinction is attributed to feral cats, foxes, dogs, roadkill, poisoning and trapping.

Image credit: aussieark.org.au

Eastern Curlew. Sadly, they’re critically endangered and have declined by more than 80% in the past 50 years.

Image credit: Zoos Victoria

 

The Black-footed Tree-rat can weigh almost a kilogram and stands up to 31 cm tall. Populations have declined by an estimated 30-50% in the last decade.

Its threats include changes in fire regimes and predation by feral cats.

Image credit: Adobe Stock

The main threat to the Southern Corroboree Frog is the disease Chytridiomycosis. This is a big cause of frog deaths worldwide. Another issue is climate change, which is having an effect on the frog's alpine home environment.

Image credit: Jodi Rowley

Some of Australia's threatened wildlife

Some of Australia's threatened wildlife

Australia is one of the most important nations on Earth for biodiversity. In fact, it is one of only 17 ‘megadiverse’ nations and is home to more species than any other developed country. Click below to learn about Australian wildlife on the Australian Wildlife Conservancy website.

Endangered brush-tailed rock wallabies starving to death from habitat destruction (fire and drought).

Image credit: Craig Pentland / DPAW

Eastern quolls were once part of the Australian landscape for millions of years. The last Eastern quoll on the Australian mainland is thought to have been killed in 1963. The cause of their mainland extinction is attributed to feral cats, foxes, dogs, roadkill, poisoning and trapping.

Image credit: aussieark.org.au

Mountain pygmy possums are a critically endangered alpine species

Image credit: Zoos Victoria

 

The Black-footed Tree-rat can weigh almost a kilogram and stands up to 31 cm tall. Populations have declined by an estimated 30-50% in the last decade.

Its threats include changes in fire regimes and predation by feral cats.

Image credit: Adobe Stock

The main threat to the Southern Corroboree Frog is the disease Chytridiomycosis. This is a big cause of frog deaths worldwide. Another issue is climate change, which is having an effect on the frog's alpine home environment.

Image credit: Jodi Rowley

Koalas are in serious decline suffering from the effects of habitat destruction, domestic dog attacks, bushfires and road accidents. The Australian Koala Foundation estimates that there are less than 100,000 Koalas left in the wild, possibly as few as 43,000.

Image credit: ABC News: Rachel Carbonell

Eastern Curlew. Sadly, they’re critically endangered and have declined by more than 80% in the past 50 years.

Image credit: Zoos Victoria

Long-nosed potoroos have had their habitat burned by fires. Threats include feral cats, wild dogs, red foxes, human settlement, habitat degradation and inappropriate fire regimes.

Image credit: Adobe Stock

Endangered brush-tailed rock wallabies starving to death from habitat destruction (fire and drought).

Image credit: Craig Pentland / DPAW

Eastern quolls were once part of the Australian landscape for millions of years. The last Eastern quoll on the Australian mainland is thought to have been killed in 1963. The cause of their mainland extinction is attributed to feral cats, foxes, dogs, roadkill, poisoning and trapping.

Image credit: aussieark.org.au

Mountain pygmy possums are a critically endangered alpine species

Image credit: Zoos Victoria

 

The Black-footed Tree-rat can weigh almost a kilogram and stands up to 31 cm tall. Populations have declined by an estimated 30-50% in the last decade.

Its threats include changes in fire regimes and predation by feral cats.

Image credit: Adobe Stock

The main threat to the Southern Corroboree Frog is the disease Chytridiomycosis. This is a big cause of frog deaths worldwide. Another issue is climate change, which is having an effect on the frog's alpine home environment.

Image credit: Jodi Rowley

Koalas are in serious decline suffering from the effects of habitat destruction, domestic dog attacks, bushfires and road accidents. The Australian Koala Foundation estimates that there are less than 100,000 Koalas left in the wild, possibly as few as 43,000.

Image credit: ABC News: Rachel Carbonell

Eastern Curlew. Sadly, they’re critically endangered and have declined by more than 80% in the past 50 years.

Image credit: Zoos Victoria

Long-nosed potoroos have had their habitat burned by fires. Threats include feral cats, wild dogs, red foxes, human settlement, habitat degradation and inappropriate fire regimes.

Image credit: Adobe Stock

Australian Wildlife Conservancy as explained by Sir David Attenborough.

Australian Wildlife Conservancy as explained by Sir David Attenborough.

Australian Wildlife Conservancy

Australian Wildlife Conservancy as explained by Sir David Attenborough.

We have partnered with Australia Wildlife Conservation, which is the largest not for profit owner and manager of land for conservation in Australia. They are responsible for the effective preservation of all native animal species across 6,500,000 hectares in Australia. This is achieved through several land and pest management projects, including the biggest network of feral cat and fox-free land on mainland Australia. Which has helped countless endangered species be successfully reintroduced to their former habitats.  

The scale of the organisations land management activities are unprecedented in Australia. AWC conduct the biggest non-government fire management program in the country in the Kimberley region of north-western Australia.Through their network of large-scale wildlife sanctuaries in remote and iconic regions across Australia, they protect some of the nation’s most iconic and endangered wildlife including 72% of native mammal species, 88% of native bird species, 55% of reptile species and 54% of amphibian species.

Australian Wildlife Conservancy

We have partnered with Australia Wildlife Conservation, which is the largest not for profit owner and manager of land for conservation in Australia. They are responsible for the effective preservation of all native animal species across 6,500,000 hectares in Australia.

This is achieved through several land and pest management projects, including the biggest network of feral cat and fox-free land on mainland Australia. Which has helped countless endangered species be successfully reintroduced to their former habitats.  

 

The scale of the organisations land management activities are unprecedented in Australia. AWC conduct the biggest non-government fire management program in the country in the Kimberley region of north-western Australia.

Through their network of large-scale wildlife sanctuaries in remote and iconic regions across Australia, they protect some of the nation’s most iconic and endangered wildlife including 72% of native mammal species, 88% of native bird species, 55% of reptile species and 54% of amphibian species.

Australian Wildlife Conservancy

We have partnered with Australia Wildlife Conservation, which is the largest not for profit owner and manager of land for conservation in Australia. They are responsible for the effective preservation of all native animal species across 6,500,000 hectares in Australia.

This is achieved through several land and pest management projects, including the biggest network of feral cat and fox-free land on mainland Australia. Which has helped countless endangered species be successfully reintroduced to their former habitats.  

The scale of the organisations land management activities are unprecedented in Australia. AWC conduct the biggest non-government fire management program in the country in the Kimberley region of north-western Australia.

Through their network of large-scale wildlife sanctuaries in remote and iconic regions across Australia, they protect some of the nation’s most iconic and endangered wildlife including 72% of native mammal species, 88% of native bird species, 55% of reptile species and 54% of amphibian species.

Feral cats are the single greatest threat to wildlife, killing millions of native animals each day.

Australian Wildlife Conservancy

Conservative estimates put the number of feral cats across Australia at three million.

Australian Wildlife Conservancy

Inaction or ‘business as usual’ for conservation will lead to additional extinctions.

Australian Wildlife Conservancy

Feral cats are the single greatest threat to wildlife, killing millions of native animals each day.

Australian Wildlife Conservancy

Feral cats are the single greatest threat to wildlife, killing millions of native animals each day.

Australian Wildlife Conservancy

Conservative estimates put the number of feral cats across Australia at three million.

Australian Wildlife Conservancy

Conservative estimates put the number of feral cats across Australia at three million.

Australian Wildlife Conservancy

Inaction or ‘business as usual’ for conservation will lead to additional extinctions.

Australian Wildlife Conservancy

Inaction or ‘business as usual’ for conservation will lead to additional extinctions.

Australian Wildlife Conservancy

You can take action!

Through interviewing a series of amazing wildlife heroes, we learned some interesting facts and ways to help native wildlife and the environment in our everyday life. View the videos below to learn more about these amazing people and organisations working together to help preserve Australia's precious biodiversity.

The Boom Shankar team interview Tim White from Australian Wildlife Conservancy at the Curramore sanctuary on the Sunshine Coast. They discuss the important role AWC plays in preserving all Australian wildlife and the habitats in which they live. Watch the video or click the link below to learn more about AWC.  

Sharon Brennan is a WILVO'S wildlife rescue volunteer on the Sunshine Coast. She talks to the Boom Shankar team about caring for native wildlife, what people can do to help and her personal experiences. Watch the video or click the link below to learn more about WILVO's.

You can take action!

Through interviewing a series of amazing wildlife heroes, we learned some interesting facts and ways to help native wildlife and the environment in our everyday life. View the videos below to learn more about these amazing people and organisations working together to help preserve Australia's precious biodiversity.

The Boom Shankar team interview Tim White from Australian Wildlife Conservancy at the Curramore sanctuary on the Sunshine Coast. They discuss the important role AWC plays in preserving all Australian wildlife and the habitats in which they live. Watch the video or click the link below to learn more about AWC.  

Sharon Brennan is a WILVO'S wildlife rescue volunteer on the Sunshine Coast. She talks to the Boom Shankar team about caring for native wildlife, what people can do to help and her personal experiences. Watch the video or click the link below to learn more about WILVO's.

You can take action!

Through interviewing a series of amazing wildlife heroes, we learned some interesting facts and ways to help native wildlife and the environment in our everyday life. Swipe right through the videos below to learn more about these amazing people and organisations working together to help preserve Australia's precious biodiversity.

Sharon Brennan is a WILVO'S wildlife rescue volunteer on the Sunshine Coast. She talks to the Boom Shankar team about caring for native wildlife, what people can do to help and her personal experiences. Watch the video or click the link below to learn more about WILVO's.

The Boom Shankar team interview Tim White from Australian Wildlife Conservancy at the Curramore sanctuary on the Sunshine Coast. They discuss the important role AWC plays in preserving all Australian wildlife and the habitats in which they live. Watch the video or click the link below to learn more about AWC.  

Boom Shankar operates with a strong social and environmental conscience having supported many Australian charities and schools as well as animal projects in India. After witnessing the devastating bushfires blaze across Australia in 2019-2020, our founder Dui's big heart just had to get involved.

" I never thought a bushfire would ravage so close to my home, and seeing upfront the devastation and the burnt aftermath and knowing all those precious animals hard perished was just heartbreaking. I just had to do something about it. I thought Hello Possum was a good place to start our environmental awareness journey". - Dui Cameron, Founder of Boom Shankar

WWF's Living Planet Report 2020 reveals global wildlife populations fell by 68%, on average, between 1970 and 2016, while some Australian populations plummeted by up to 97%.

WWF conservation scientist Dr Martin Taylor

Boom Shankar operates with a strong social and environmental conscience having supported many Australian charities and schools as well as animal projects in India. After witnessing the devastating bushfires blaze across Australia in 2019-2020, our founder Dui's big heart just had to get involved.

" I never thought a bushfire would ravage so close to my home, and seeing upfront the devastation and the burnt aftermath and knowing all those precious animals hard perished was just heartbreaking. I just had to do something about it. I thought Hello Possum was a good place to start our environmental awareness journey". - Dui Cameron, Founder of Boom Shankar

" I never thought a bushfire would ravage so close to my home, and seeing upfront the devastation and the burnt aftermath and knowing all those precious animals hard perished was just heartbreaking. I just had to do something about it. I thought Hello Possum was a good place to start our environmental awareness journey." - Dui Cameron, Founder of Boom Shankar

WWF's Living Planet Report 2020 reveals global wildlife populations fell by 68%, on average, between 1970 and 2016, while some Australian populations plummeted by up to 97%.

WWF conservation scientist Dr Martin Taylor

Boom Shankar operates with a strong social and environmental conscience having supported many Australian charities and schools as well as animal projects in India. After witnessing the devastating bushfires blaze across Australia in 2019-2020, our founder Dui's big heart just had to get involved.

" I never thought a bushfire would ravage so close to my home, and seeing upfront the devastation and the burnt aftermath and knowing all those precious animals hard perished was just heartbreaking. I just had to do something about it. I thought Hello Possum was a good place to start our environmental awareness journey". - Dui Cameron, Founder of Boom Shankar

WWF's Living Planet Report 2020 reveals global wildlife populations fell by 68%, on average, between 1970 and 2016, while some Australian populations plummeted by up to 97%.

WWF conservation scientist Dr Martin Taylor

Be part of the conversation #hellopossum

Many thanks to all who made this possible

KATIE NOONAN

KATIE NOONAN

#liveinboom

Be part of the conversation,

#hellopossum spread the love!

#liveinboom

Be part of the conversation,

#hellopossum spread the love!

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